Ancient Greek Pederasty, Feat. The History of Ancient Greece – Showcase, Greek History

Ancient Greece – there’s hardly a more revered civilization in Western history, yet it’s also notorious, particularly for a little thing called pederasty: institutionalized love between an older man and a much younger man. But what was pederasty really like? Was it exploitative? Was it always even sexual? And was it really that different from the courtly love of later eras?

In today’s showcase episode, Ryan Stitt of the podcast The History of Ancient Greece brings it all out of the closet.

This episode has been sponsored by LetsGetChecked. Go to www.trylgc.com/btnewberg and use code “history” to get 20% off your purchase.

Don’t forget to subscribe, rate, and review. Support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/btnewberg. Research, writing, editing, and production by B. T. Newberg. Logo Design by Rachel Westhoff. Animation by Maxeem Konrardy. Additional credits, references, and more at www.historyofsexpod.com.

Audio Credits

Podcast theme music mixed from “Gregorian Chant”, “Mystery Sax”, and “There It Is” by Kevin MacLeod.

Stitt, Ryan. “071 Love, Sex, and Prostitution.” Originally aired on The History of Ancient Greece. 2019.

Image Credits

Zephyrus and Hyacinthus, from Wikipedia

 

3 thoughts on “Ancient Greek Pederasty, Feat. The History of Ancient Greece – Showcase, Greek History

  1. I really like the history of sex podcast and was looking forward to this topic. Unfortunately, The History of Ancient Greece apparently did not do any research and instead just read out the Wikipedia articles on to topic word by word (for example: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_ancient_Greece)
    I know that good podcasting is a lot of work and I highly appreciate the work and efforts you put I to this but I was a bit disappointed to find this out.

    Like

      1. So, it turns out the History of Ancient Greece host is a Wikipedia editor and sometimes uses his podcast material to improve Wikipedia articles. So yes, there may be some similarity but it’s not due to copying from Wikipedia, but rather the other way around. Thanks for checking and keeping us on our toes, though!

        Like

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